Drs Martin & Sue Allbright

'Blending an ancient medical approach of mind and body with modern health'

C

Acupuncture Research

C

Structure

Density

Rigidity

Evidence

We would like to share with you our personal view, beliefs and approach about the research that is presented on these pages.






We both value the research of modern science and the many developments that have been discovered.

We also value the depth of wisdom and knowledge of traditional and classical five element acupuncture, which integrates the many aspects of body and mind.

We acknowledge the information gained from research, and we endevaour to use it where appropriate when meeting the needs of an individual who is suffering in health.

We hope later to share more information on the five elements of acupuncture.

01684-893393

Classical Acupuncture

This site was last updated on

20th August 2018


Copyright O 2018 Allrights reserved

c

Torticollis -Wry Neck Cervical Dystonia

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided in this site is accurate. It is not the intention to mislead or misinform anyone.


Acupuncture Malvern | Acupuncture Worcester | Acupuncture Worcestershire | Acupuncture West Midlands | Malvern Acupuncture | Worcester Acupuncture  Worcestershire Acupuncture | West Midlands Acupuncture

Confidentiality

© copyright Drs Martin & Sue Allbright 2009 All rights reserved

Website design by MA


Go to top

Go to top

(2013) Observation on the clinical efficacy of spasmodic torticollis treated with matrix needling technique and acupuncture at "Wuxin points" compared to botox injections.

METHODS: Forty-two cases were randomized into an acupuncture group and a botox group, 21 cases in each one. In the acupuncture group, the matrix needling technique was used and acupuncture was adopted at Fengchi (GB 20), "Wuxin points" [Shuigou (GV 26), bilateral Laogong (PC 8) and bilateral Yongquan (KI 1)] and local Ashi points. In the botox group, botox type A was injected at several spots of local region. The treatment course was 1 month in the two groups. The efficacy in each weekend and the results of follow-up visit in half a year after treatment were compared between the two groups.

The markedly effective rate and the total effective rate were not different significantly between the two groups in the treatment of 1 month and the follow-up visit in half a year (all P > 0.05). There was no adverse reaction in the acupuncture group. There were 14 cases of adverse reactions in the botox group, in which 9 cases of neck muscular weakness and 5 cases of neck muscular pain.'

Xu YL, Jin YJ, Zhang HT, Xu XM. (2013) Observation on the clinical efficacy of spasmodic torticollis treated with matrix needling technique and acupuncture at "Wuxin points" mainly. Chinese Acupuncture & Moxibustion [2013, 33(6):513-516]

(2013) Comparison between the effect of acupuncture and conventional medical treatment in acute torticollis.

Patients who consulted between October 2011 and March 2012 for a first fit of acute torticollis evolving for less than 48 hours were randomized into 2 groups of 20 patients each. Group 1 (G1) received acupuncture treatment alone. One to three sessions of needle acupuncture were performed according to the rules of traditional Chinese medicine. We used a single distal point, Houxi (IG.3)The assessment focused on the pain through visual analogical scale (VAS) and on the mobility of the cervical spine (Chin-sternum distance, chinacromion distance, earlobe–acromion distance) at baseline, at the end of each acupuncture session for G1, and 15 days after the end of treatment for both groups.

Eighty percent of the patients in G1 were cured after one session of acupuncture. No patient in G1 had to stop working. No adverse reactions were observed for G1.

Conclusions: Our results show that needle acupuncture is an effective and safe short term treatment for people with acute torticollis. It has beneficial effects on mobility and pain related to motion in those patients. It seems more effective than pharmacotherapy alone.

K. Ben Abdelghani,, A. Fazaa, L. Souabni, S. Kassab, S. Chekili, A. Laatar , L. Zakraoui (2013) Comparison between the effect of acupuncture and conventional medical treatment in acute torticollis. Ann Rheum Dis 2013 72: A993 doi: 10.1136/annrheumdis-2013-eular.2993

(2010) Effectiveness of acupuncture in cervical dystonia. Case report.

'Method. The acupuncture points selected ... were a combination of classical Chinese points along with segmental points. The acupuncture points we used were GV14, GB20, GB21, SI9, SI10, SI11, SI12 and LI4. Needle depth was varied and periosteal ‘pecking’and manual stimulation was done where possible. De qi was not sought after insertion and the needles were left in place for 15–20 min.

Outcome. She obtained more than 50% pain relief from the initial course of acupuncture and she continued to receive top-ups of acupuncture every 8–10 weeks alternating with Botox injections'

Ravindran Deepak, Hans Mathew, Mathew Koshy(2010) Effectiveness of acupuncture in cervical dystonia. Acupunct Med June 2010 Vol 28 No 2

(2009) A Case Study Demonstrating the Effectiveness of Acupuncture in Treating Acute Non-specific Torticollis

Treat every 2nd day for the first week, then reassess frequency. Initial Treatment Needle TH.3 through to S.I.3 (L/S). Stimulate continuously while patient attempts to move neck from side to side.Once movement is re-established, remove needle and implement part 2 of treatment. Part 2 of treatment consists of: GB.20, and GB.21 Bilaterally; GV.14 (with moxa) needle directed toward the affected side, and Bl.60 (Bilaterally).

Siegenthaler DT  (2009) A Case Study Demonstrating the Effectiveness of Acupuncture in Treating Acute Non-specific Torticollis

(2003) Acupuncture for Acute Torticollis: A Pilot Study

'The use of subjective end-points such as VAS pain scales in studies of acupuncture for chronic neck pain have resulted in equivocal results. This study introduces an objective parameter as the primary end-point for the assessment of acupuncture in patients with acute torticollis (stiff neck). Eighteen patients underwent a single 20-minute treatment session, with needling of two acupuncture points Hou Hsi (SI-3) and Luo Zhen (M-UE-24), on the side ipsilateral to the predominantly involved side of the neck. Measuring the angle of lateral head rotation using a simple compass and protractor, a mean improvement of 52.9% was found, more so among those presenting earlier (< 24 hours) as opposed to later (> 72 hours; p = 0.034).'

Samuels N. (2003) Acupuncture for Acute Torticollis: A Pilot Study The American Journal of Chinese Medicine, January 2003, Vol. 31, No. 05 : pp. 803-807

(1997) EMG analysis for long-term acupuncture treatment and single acupuncture stimulation in a patient with spasmodic torticollis. Case study

'A 37-year-old man with spasmodic torticollis received acupuncture treatment mainly for neck and shoulder girdle once a week from February 1995. Surface EMG data was analyzed 12 times between December 1995 and November 1996. Acupuncture stimulation was given on the right trapezius muscle. With long-term acupuncture treatment, the high voltage burst discharge of the right trapezius muscle as one of initial finding was gradually decreased and the abnormal neck posture was considerably improved. These observations throws a light to using acupuncture as a possibly effective treatment for abnormal movement disorders such as spasmodic torticollis.'

Makiko Tani, Rie Nabeta, Toshiaki Suzuki, Yoshiro Yase (1997) EMG analysis for long-term acupuncture treatment and single acupuncture stimulation in a patient with spasmodic torticollis. Electroencephalography and Clinical Neurophysiology > 1997 > 103 > 1 > 90. journal ISSN : 0013-4694

(1987) Acupuncture treatment of acute torticollis

'Summary.Seventeen persons suffering from acute idiopathic torticollis with muscle spasm and pain in the neck, were successfully treated with body acupuncture and moxibustion. The acupuncture Points used were: large intestine meridian Ll4, Gall bladder meridian GB 20,21, Urinary bladder meridian UB10'. ). Each needle was introduced at right angles to the skin and to a depth of about 0.5 inch (1.25cm), on the ipsilateral side. Needling was then commenced, Each needle was manipulated until 'tehchi' sion of acupuncture and moxibustion the following day, for residual pain.'

Beatrice Umeh (1987) Acupuncture treatment of acute torticollis. Acupunct Med 1987 4: 10-11. doi: 10.1136/aim.4.1.10


Go to top

Go to top

Go to top