Drs Martin & Sue Allbright

'Blending an ancient medical approach of mind and body with modern health'

C

Acupuncture Research

C

Structure

Density

Rigidity

Evidence

We would like to share with you our personal view, beliefs and approach about the research that is presented on these pages.






We both value the research of modern science and the many developments that have been discovered.

We also value the depth of wisdom and knowledge of traditional and classical five element acupuncture, which integrates the many aspects of body and mind.

We acknowledge the information gained from research, and we endevaour to use it where appropriate when meeting the needs of an individual who is suffering in health.

We hope later to share more information on the five elements of acupuncture.

01684-893393

Classical Acupuncture

This site was last updated on

20th August 2018


Copyright O 2018 Allrights reserved

c

Chronic Pain

(2017) Management of chronic pain using complementary and integrative medicine.

‘Abstract. Complementary and integrative medicine (CIM) encompasses both Western-style medicine and complementary health approaches as a new combined approach to treat a variety of clinical conditions. Chronic pain is the leading indication for use of CIM, and about 33% of adults and 12% of children in the US have used it in this context. Although advances have been made in treatments for chronic pain, it remains inadequately controlled for many people. Adverse effects and complications of analgesic drugs, such as addiction, kidney failure, and gastrointestinal bleeding, also limit their use. CIM offers a multimodality treatment approach that can tackle the multidimensional nature of pain with fewer or no serious adverse effects. This review focuses on the use of CIM in three conditions with a high incidence of chronic pain: back pain, neck pain, and rheumatoid arthritis. It summarizes research on the mechanisms of action and clinical studies on the efficacy of commonly used CIM modalities such as acupuncture, mind-body system, dietary interventions and fasting, and herbal medicine and nutrients.’

L Chen, A Michalsen  (2017) Management of chronic pain using complementary and integrative medicine. BMJ 2017; 357 doi:  https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j1284 (Published 24 April 2017)

(2017) Acupuncture for chronic pain and depression in primary care: a programme of research.

‘METHODS AND RESULTS: We synthesised the evidence from high-quality trials of acupuncture for chronic pain, consisting of musculoskeletal pain related to the neck and low back, osteoarthritis of the knee, and headache and migraine, involving nearly 18,000 patients. In an individual patient data (IPD) pairwise meta-analysis, acupuncture was significantly better than both sham acupuncture (p < 0.001) and usual care (p < 0.001) for all conditions. Using network meta-analyses, we compared acupuncture with other physical therapies for osteoarthritis of the knee. In both an analysis of all available evidence and an analysis of a subset of better-quality trials, using aggregate-level data, we found acupuncture to be one of the more effective therapies. We developed new Bayesian methods for analysing multiple individual patient-level data sets to evaluate heterogeneous continuous outcomes.

CONCLUSION: We have provided the most robust evidence from high-quality trials on acupuncture for chronic pain. The synthesis of high-quality Individual Patient Data (IPD) found that acupuncture was more effective than both usual care and sham acupuncture. Acupuncture is one of the more clinically effective physical therapies for osteoarthritis and is also cost-effective if only high-quality trials are analysed.’

MacPherson H, Vickers A, Bland M, Torgerson D, Corbett M, Spackman E, Saramago P, Woods B, Weatherly H, Sculpher M, Manca A, Richmond S, Hopton A, Eldred J, Watt I. (2017) Acupuncture for chronic pain and depression in primary care: a programme of research. Southampton (UK): NIHR Journals Library; 2017 Jan.

(2017) The persistence of the effects of acupuncture after a course of treatment: a meta-analysis of patients with chronic pain.


‘Abstract. There is uncertainty regarding how long the effects of acupuncture treatment persist after a course of treatment. We aimed to determine the trajectory of pain scores over time after acupuncture, using large individual patient data set from high-quality randomised trials of acupuncture for chronic pain. The available individual data set included 29 trials and 17,922 patients. The chronic conditions included musculoskeletal pain (low back, neck and shoulder) osteoarthritis of the knee, and headache /  migraine. We used meta-analytic techniques to determine the trajectory of posttreatment pain scores. Data on longer term follow-up were available for 20 trials, including 6376 patients. In trials comparing acupuncture to no acupuncture control (wait-list, usual care etc,) effect sizes diminished by a non significant 0.011 SD per 3 months (95% confidence interval: -0.014 to 0.037, P = 0.4) after treatment ended. The central estimates suggests that approximately 90% of the benefit of acupuncture relative to controls would be sustained at 12 months. For the trials comparing acupuncture to sham, we observed a reducation in effect size of 0.025 SD per 3 months (95% confidence interval: 0.000-0.050), suggesting approximately a 50% diminution at 12 months. The effects of a course of acupuncture treatment for patients with chronic pain do not seem to decrease importantly over 12 months. Patients can generally be reassured that treatment effects persist. Studies of the cost-effectiveness of acupuncture should take our findings into account when considering the time horizon of acupuncture effects. Further research should measure longer term outcomes of acupuncture.’

MacPherson, H.; Vertosick, E.A.; Foster, N.E.; Lewith, G.; Linde, K.; Sherman, K.J.; Witt, C.M.; Vickers, A.J. (2016) The persistence of the effects of acupuncture after a course of treatment: a meta-analysis of patients with chronic pain. Pub. Pain:

October 17, 2016. doi: 10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000747 International Association for the study of pain.

Go to top

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided in this site is accurate. It is not the intention to mislead or misinform anyone.


Acupuncture Malvern | Acupuncture Worcester | Acupuncture Worcestershire | Acupuncture West Midlands | Malvern Acupuncture | Worcester Acupuncture  Worcestershire Acupuncture | West Midlands Acupuncture

Confidentiality

© copyright Drs Martin & Sue Allbright 2009 All rights reserved

Website design by MA


Go to top

See also benefits of acupuncture for Aromatase inhibitor induced arthralgia