Drs Martin & Sue Allbright

'Blending an ancient medical approach of mind and body with modern health'

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Acupuncture Research

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Structure

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We would like to share with you our personal view, beliefs and approach about the research that is presented on these pages.






We both value the research of modern science and the many developments that have been discovered.

We also value the depth of wisdom and knowledge of traditional and classical five element acupuncture, which integrates the many aspects of body and mind.

We acknowledge the information gained from research, and we endevaour to use it where appropriate when meeting the needs of an individual who is suffering in health.

We hope later to share more information on the five elements of acupuncture.

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Classical Acupuncture

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17th October 2017


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Chronic Fatigue Syndrome - CFS

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(2017) A Systematic Review of Acupuncture for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

'Objectives : To evaluate and summarize the efficacy and safety of acupuncture treatment (AT) in chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Methods : Fifteen databases (Pubmed, Cochrane, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, CNKI, Wanfang, and eight Korean databases) were searched up to September 2016. Only trials in which acupuncture was the sole treatment were included. Fatigue was used as the primary outcome measure, while the quality of life, pain, mood disorders, and adverse events were used as secondary outcome measures.

Conclusion : This review found evidence that patients with CFS may generally benefit from alleviation of symptoms by acupuncture treatment, and there is no evidence of worsening symptoms or causing of serious adverse events. A positive effect on fatigue and pain was observed, but no conclusion for improving quality of life and mood disorders.'

Kim HG et al. (2017) A Systematic Review of Acupuncture for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. The Acupuncture. Vol 34, No2 ,May 2017.

(2017) Acupuncture and moxibustion for chronic fatigue syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Results. A total of 31 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were enrolled in analyses. In traditional direct meta-analysis, we found that in comparison to Chinese herbal medicine, CbAM (combined acupuncture and moxibustion, which meant two or more types of acupuncture and moxibustion were adopted) had a higher total effective rate (RR (95% CI), 1.17 (1.09 ~ 1.25)). Compared with Chinese herbal medicine, western medicine and sham-acupuncture, SAM (single acupuncture or single moxibustion) had a higher total effective rate, with RR (95% CI) of 1.22 (1.14 ~ 1.30), 1.51 (1.31–1.74), 5.90 (3.64–9.56). In addition, compared with SAM, CbAM had a higher total effective rate (RR (95% CI), 1.23 (1.12 ~ 1.36)). In network meta-analyses, similar results were recorded. Subsequently, we ranked all treatments from high to low effective rate and the order was CbAM, SAM, Chinese herbal medicine, western medicine and sham-acupuncture.

Conclusions. In the treatment of CFS, CbAM and SAM may have better effect than other treatments. However, the included trials have relatively poor quality, hence high quality studies are needed to confirm our finding.

Taiwu Wang, Cong Xu, Keli Pan and Hongyan Xiong (2017) Acupuncture and moxibustion for chronic fatigue syndrome in traditional Chinese medicine: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Pub. BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine DOI: 10.1186/s12906-017-1647-x

(2016) Acupuncture and Moxibustion have Different Effects on Fatigue by Regulating the Autonomic Nervous System: A Pilot Controlled Clinical Trial.

'Both acupuncture and moxibustion improved fatigue in CFS patients, but moxibustion was more effective. Moxibustion was' also 'more effective than acupuncture in long-term treatment of CFS.'

Symtomatic acupuncture treatment.

'We selected acupoints ST36 (bilateral) and CV4, which can reinforce qi in TCM theories and ameliorate fatigue in Western medical systems. In the control group and acupuncture group, 3 acupoints were stimulated by single-use stainless steel needles (0.30 mm × 40 mm). Each intervention session lasted 15 minutes, and the sessions were performed identically in both groups. The acupuncturist manipulated the needle by lifting-thrusting and twirling-rotating every 5 minutes to maintain the Deqi sensation, which means that the participants felt soreness, aching, and deep pressure as described in the Massachusetts General Hospital acupuncture sensation scales.'

'The moxibustion group received warming from indirect moxibustion using a commercially available moxibustion box.The moxa was burned about 1 to 2 cm above the acupoint skin for 15 minutes.'

'Every participant in the 3 groups received 10 sessions, which were administered every other day'

Shu, Q. et al. (2016) Acupuncture and Moxibustion have Different Effects on Fatigue by Regulating the Autonomic Nervous System: A Pilot Controlled Clinical Trial. Sci. Rep. 6, 37846; doi: 10.1038/srep37846 (2016).

(2005) Acupuncture in the treatment of post viral fatigue syndrome – a case report.

'Abstract: This case report concerns the treatment of post viral fatigue (chronic fatigue syndrome) with electroacupuncture. This condition is particularly difficult to treat whether using conventional or complementary therapy. Whilst the treatment did not cure the patient, it appears to have facilitated her return to work and markedly improved her symptoms.'

Mears T. (2005) Acupuncture in the treatment of post viral fatigue syndrome – a case report ACUPUNCTURE IN MEDICINE 2005;23(3):141-145.