Drs Martin & Sue Allbright

'Blending an ancient medical approach of mind and body with modern health'

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Acupuncture Research

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Structure

Density

Rigidity

Evidence

We would like to share with you our personal view, beliefs and approach about the research that is presented on these pages.






We both value the research of modern science and the many developments that have been discovered.

We also value the depth of wisdom and knowledge of traditional and classical five element acupuncture, which integrates the many aspects of body and mind.

We acknowledge the information gained from research, and we endevaour to use it where appropriate when meeting the needs of an individual who is suffering in health.

We hope later to share more information on the five elements of acupuncture.

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Classical Acupuncture

This site was last updated on

17th October 2017


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Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

Every effort has been made to ensure that the information provided in this site is accurate. It is not the intention to mislead or misinform anyone.


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(2017) The Acupuncture Effect on Median Nerve

Morphology in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: An Ultrasonographic Study

we showed that acupuncture improves clinical and electrophysiological findings of CTS and also decreases CSA (cross sectional area) of the median nerve at the wrist. Our results need to be confirmed in future studies with larger sample, long-term monitoring, and placebo controlled studies. Finally, ultrasound seems to be a practical imaging tool for diagnosis and monitoring in these patients.’

Fatma Gülçin Ural and Gökhan Tuna Öztürk (2017) The Acupuncture Effect on Median Nerve Morphology in Patients with Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: An Ultrasonographic Study. Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine Volume 2017, Article ID 7420648, 5 pages https://doi.org/10.1155/2017/7420648


(2016) Rewiring the primary somatosensory cortex in carpal tunnel syndrome with acupuncture.


'primary somatosensory cortex subregions are distinctly targeted by local versus distal acupuncture electrostimulation, acupuncture at local versus distal sites may improve median nerve function at the wrist by somatotopically distinct neuroplasticity in the primary somatosensory cortex following therapy. Our study further suggests that improvements in primary somatosensory cortex somatotopy can predict long-term clinical outcomes for carpal tunnel syndrome.'


Maeda Y., Kim H. et al. (2016) Rewiring the primary somatosensory cortex in carpal tunnel syndrome with acupuncture. BRAIN 2017: Page 1 of 14 | 1. doi:10.1093/brain/awx015


(2009) Acupuncture in Patients With Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial


Objectives: To investigate the efficacy of acupuncture compared with steroid treatment in patients with mild-to-moderate carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) as measured by objective changes in nerve conduction studies (NCS) and subjective symptoms assessment in a randomized, controlled study.


Methods: A total of 77 consecutive and prospective CTS patients confirmed by NCS were enrolled in the study. Those who had fixed sensory complaint over the median nerve and thenar muscle atrophy were excluded. The CTS patients were randomly divided into 2 treatment arms: (1) 2 weeks of prednisolone 20 mg daily followed by 2 weeks of prednisolone 10 mg daily (n =39), and (2) acupuncture administered in 8 sessions over 4 weeks (n=38). A validated standard questionnaire as a subjective measurement was used to rate the 5 major symptoms (pain, numbness, paresthesia, weakness/clumsiness, and nocturnal awakening) on a scale from 0 (no symptoms) to 10 (very severe). The total score in each of the 5 categories was termed the global symptom score (GSS). Patients completed standard questionnaires at baseline and 2 and 4 weeks later. The changes in GSS were analyzed to evaluate the statistical significance. NCS were performed at baseline and repeated at the end of the study to assess improvement. All main analyses used intent-to-treat.


Results: A total of 77 patients who fulfilled the criteria for mild-to-moderate CTS were recruited in the study. There were 38 in the acupuncture group and 39 in the steroid group. The evaluation of GSS showed that there was a high percentage of improvement in both groups at weeks 2 and 4 (P<0.01), though statistical significance was not demonstrated between the 2 groups (P=0.15). Of the 5 main symptoms scores (pain, numbness, paresthesia, weakness/clumsiness, nocturnal awakening), only 1, nocturnal awakening, showed a significant decrease in acupuncture compared with the steroid group at week 4 (P=0.03). Patients with acupuncture treatment had a significant decrease in distal motor latency compared with the steroid group at week 4 (P=0.012). Acupuncture was well tolerated with minimal adverse effects.


Conclusions: Short-term acupuncture treatment is as effective as short-term low-dose prednisolone for mild-to-moderate CTS. For those who do have an intolerance or contraindication for oral steroid or for those who do not opt for early surgery, acupuncture treatment provides an alternative choice.


Yang, Chun-Pai; Hsieh, Ching-Liang; Wang, Nai-Hwei; Li, Tsai-Chung et al. (2009) Acupuncture in Patients With Carpal Tunnel Syndrome: A Randomized Controlled Trial Clinical Journal of Pain: May 2009 - Volume 25 - Issue 4 - pp 327-333 doi: 10.1097/AJP.0b013e318190511c

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