Drs Martin & Sue Allbright

'Blending an ancient medical approach of mind and body with modern health'

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Acupuncture Research

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Structure

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We would like to share with you our personal view, beliefs and approach about the research that is presented on these pages.






We both value the research of modern science and the many developments that have been discovered.

We also value the depth of wisdom and knowledge of traditional and classical five element acupuncture, which integrates the many aspects of body and mind.

We acknowledge the information gained from research, and we endevaour to use it where appropriate when meeting the needs of an individual who is suffering in health.

We hope later to share more information on the five elements of acupuncture.

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Classical Acupuncture

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17th October 2017


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Bladder Problems

‘Overactive - Urgency - Stress Urinary Incontinence’

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Efficacy of electrical pudendal nerve stimulation (EPNS) [Electroacupuncture to approx BL 30 and BL35 Meeting of Yang Huiyang] versus transvaginal electrical stimulation (TES) in treating female idiopathic urgency urinary incontinence (UUI).

‘Results:, The severity of symptoms and quality of life score on the UUI questionnaire (UUI total score) was 13 (7, 18.75) in group I and 11 (8, 16) in group II before treatment and decreased to 2 (0, 6.75) in group I (p<0.01) and 6.5 (3.25, 10.75) in group II (p<0.01) after the completion of treatment. At the end of treatment, complete symptom resolution occurred in 34 cases (42.5%), with a ≥50% symptom improvement rate of 70.1%, in group I and occurred in 1 cases (2.5%), with a ≥50% symptom improvement rate of 45.0%, in group II. Post-treatment UUI total score was lower and the therapeutic effect was better in group I than in group II (both p<0.01).


Conclusions EPNS is more effective than TES in treating drug-refractory female idiopathic UUI.


Four sacrococcygeal points (figure 2) were selected for deep insertion of long acupuncture needles. The two upper points are located about 1 cm bilateral to the sacrococcygeal joint. On the upper points, a needle of 0.40 Х 100 mm was inserted perpendicularly to a depth of 80 to 90 mm to produce a sensation referred to the urethra or the anus by stimulating the main trunk of the Pudendal nerve. The locations of the two lower points are about 1 cm bilateral to the tip of the coccyx. On the lower points, a needle of 0.40 Х 100 or 125 mm was inserted obliquely towards the ischiorectal fossa to a depth of 90 to 110 m to produce a sensation referred to the urethra by stimulating the perineal nerve (figure 3).


Electrical stimulation (biphasic 2-ms pulse duration) at a frequency of 2.0 Hz and a moderate intensity (25-35 mA). The electrostimulation was set for 60 min each time. Pelvic floor muscle (PFM) contractions around the urethra (often comfortable) must be kept during the entire electrostimulation. EPNS was given three times a week for a total of three weeks.


Siyou Wang , Jianwei Lv , Xiaoming Feng , Tingting Lv (2017) Efficacy of electrical pudendal nerve stimulation versus transvaginal electrical stimulation in treating female idiopathic urgency urinary incontinence. Pub. The Journal of Urology PII: S0022-5347(17)30182-9, DOI: 10.1016/j.juro.2017.01.065 Reference: JURO 14339






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(2016) Nonantimuscarinic treatment for overactive bladder: a systematic review.

‘Abstract. Acupuncture improves quality of life and urodynamic testing parameters.’ Olivera C.K. et al. (2016) Nonantimuscarinic treatment for overactive bladder: a systematic review. American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Volume 215, Issue 1, July 2016, Pages 34–57


(2009) The efficacy of acupuncture in treating urge and mixed incontinence in women: a pilot study.

‘Acupuncture improved urodynamic outcomes (maximum cystometric capacity) (Incontinence Impact questionnaire-7)’ S. Engberg, S. Cohen, S.M. Sereika (2009) The efficacy of acupuncture in treating urge and mixed incontinence in women: a pilot study. J Wound Ostomy Continence Nurs, 36 (2009), pp. 661–670


(2005) Acupuncture for overactive bladder: a randomized control trial.  ‘Acupuncture was superior to control for improved quality of life (Incontinence Impact questionnaire-7) and validated questionnaire outcomes (Urogenital Distress Inventory-6) in 1 RCT .

CONCLUSION: Women who received 4 weekly bladder-specific acupuncture treatments had significant improvements in bladder capacity, urgency, frequency, and quality-of-life scores as compared with women who received placebo acupuncture treatments.’ S.L. Emmons, L. Otto (2005) Acupuncture for overactive bladder: a randomized control trial Am J Obstet Gynecol, 106 (2005), pp. 138–142


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2017) Clinical Observation of Heat-sensitive Moxibustion Combined with Kegel Exercise Therapy for Female Stress Urinary Incontinence.

METHODS: Forty-five female patients with stress urinary incontinence were randomly divided into a treatment group (n=23) and a control group (n=22). Kegel exercise therapy was applied in the two groups. Heat-sensitive moxibustion was used at Zhongji (CV 3), Qihai (CV 6), Ciliao (BL 32) and Shen-shu (BL 23) in the treatment group, once a day for the first 10 times, and once every other day until 5 sessions were given, 10 times as one session. 1-hour pad test, International Incontinence Advisory Board questionnaire (ICIQ-SF) and the number of urine leakage were observed before and after treatment. And the clinical effect was evaluated.

RESULTS: The curative rate of 43.48%(10/23) and the total effective rate of 95.65%(22/23) in the treatment group were respectively better than those of 18.18% (4/22) and 63.64%(14/22) in the control group (both P<0.05). After treatment, 1-hour pad test and ICIQ-SF score were lower than those before treatment in the two groups, and the number of urine leakage decreased (all P<0.01). The above three indexes of the treatment group were better than those of the control group (all P<0.01).

CONCLUSIONS: Heat-sensitive moxibustion combined with kegel exercise therapy achieves better effect than simple kegel exercise therapy on female stress urinary incontinence.

Hu D, Deng P., et al., (2017) Clinical Observation of Heat-sensitive Moxibustion Combined with Kegel Exercise Therapy for Female Stress Urinary Incontinence. Zhen Ci Yan Jiu. 2017 Aug 25;42(4):338-41.

(2017) Traditional Chinese Treatment (TCM) Progress of Urge Urinary Incontinence (UUI).

A review article which looks at various TCM approaches to UUI, almost all of them demonstrating improvement however the level of research articles used is very poor. Haiyan Fan, Siyou Wang. (2017) Traditional Chinese Treatment (TCM) Progress of Urge Urinary Incontinence. Research Overview.

(2017) Effect of Electroacupuncture on Urinary Leakage Among Women With Stress Urinary Incontinence. A Randomized Clinical Trial.

'Conclusions and Relevance Among women with stress urinary incontinence, treatment with electroacupuncture involving the lumbosacral region, compared with sham electroacupuncture, resulted in less urine leakage after 6 weeks. Further research is needed to understand long-term efficacy and the mechanism of action of this intervention.'

A large powered trial of 504 patients and even though the acupuncture treatments were not individualised it shows the benefit of using local scaral acupuncture points for this condition

Zhishun Liu, Yan Liu, Huanfang Xu, et al. (2017) Effect of Electroacupuncture on Urinary Leakage Among Women With Stress Urinary Incontinence. A Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA. 2017;317(24):2493-2501. doi:10.1001/jama.2017.7220